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We've discovered a really good reason to fly Tiger

We've discovered a really good reason to fly Tiger

Posted 3 March 2016   by Amy         Permalink | Be the first to comment

Tags: Tiger, travel, food, vegan

When a colleague of mine flew with TigerAir recently she was blown away to see this on the menu:

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Are you seeing what I'm seeing?

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No more peanuts and pretzels for in-flight dinners. Now I'll be having a cheesy, tomatoey toastie to hit the spot before (safely) hitting the tarmac.

And knowing me, I'll be hanging for something sweet after smashing that toastie. You too? Well guess what ... Tiger gets us.

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Yep, you read that right -- vegan rocky road. I don't even know where to get vegan rocky road on the ground but now I can get it in the sky! What an exciting time to be alive :)

And Tiger Air isn't the only airline to now offer vegan options on their in-flight menu. Jetstar have a pumpkin and cous cous salad from Sumo Salad available and Virgin sell a felafel wrap on board their flights.

What this shows is that demand for vegan food is growing. Recent stats show that Australia is home to 480,000 vegans (and 2 million vegetarians). Some quick maths tells me that that's a WHOLE LOT of animals saved every year.

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Together we are powerful. Thanks to compassionate people choosing animal-free food (and asking for it) we're going to continue to see vegan-friendly food popping up here, there and everywhere. After all, the sky's the limit and we're already getting vegan options there!

Every day it gets easier to cut animal products out of your life. If you're keen to know more about how you can eat to save animals and the planet, we've got a great kit to get you started.

Order your free Vegetarian Starter Kit

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10 amazing places to see animals in the wild

10 amazing places to see animals in the wild

Posted 6 October 2015   by Amy         Permalink | 2 Comments

Tags: wildlife, nature, travel, exotic animals

For the animal lover, seeing an animal in captivity is no way to see an animal at all. So we're lucky to live in a time where it's increasingly easy to see wild animals in the wild, as they should be. Here's 10 incredible places across the world where you can observe animals in their natural habitat.

Churchill, Canada

Nicknamed the 'polar bear capital of the world' Churchill in Hudson Bay is one of the few places where polar bears can be seen in the wild. There are a variety of 'Tundra' adventures to choose from, which offer guided viewing of the bears. Churchill is also home to around 3,000 beluga whales during the summer months and a great place to view the Northern Lights. More »

Costa Rica

Yep, the whole of Costa Rica! The jungles of Costa Rica are brimming with monkeys, sloths, crocodiles, lizards, frogs and birds. More than 27% of the country is nature conservation areas. You can also head to Tortuguero -- a town with no cars and no streets -- during September and October to watch hundreds of baby turtles hatch on the sandy beaches and make their way into the ocean. Or head to Costa Rican Sloth Sanctuary to see some rescued sloths. More »

Great Barrier Reef, Australia
Apparently, the Great Barrier Reef is home to the happiest fish in the whole wide world.

One of the seven wonders of the world and the most extensive reef system on Earth – the Great Barrier Reef is home to a an abundance of marine species including turtles, sharks, fish and coral. More »

Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

The mountains of Volcanoes National Park are a safe haven for the mountain gorilla, with 18 gorilla groups living in the protected forests. An incredible 300 of the estimated 850 mountain gorillas remaining in the world live here. Gorilla trekking permits are required, to limit the number of visitors out of respect for the gorillas. More »

The Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

The inspiration for Darwin's theory of evolution, the Galapagos Islands has amongst its residents species that are found nowhere else in the world. Isolated from the mainland, and devoid of predators, the Islands have become a tropical paradise. Giant tortoises, penguins, seals and the aptly named blue-footed boobies are just some of the incredible animals who live peacefully in this largely untouched paradise. More »

*This very delicate ecosystem can be impacted by tourism. Be sure to talk to your travel agent about respectful travelling.

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

The Serengeti is perhaps one of the best places to see large numbers of animals in their natural habitat. It's well known for being able to spot the 'big five' -- a term coined by hunters but largely reclaimed by tourists referring to lions, elephants, buffalos, leopards and rhinoceroses. The Serengeti also boasts one of the greatest migration systems in the world, with an estimated 2 million wildebeest, giraffes and zebras migrating together at different times of the year. More »

Kangaroo Island, South Australia

Australia's national icon abounds in the native bushland on Kangaroo Island. Along with kangaroo and wallaby spotting, Kangaroo Island is home to Australian seals, penguins, koalas, echidnas and, at the right time of year, whales can be spotted off the island's shores. More »

Kaikoura, New Zealand

The south island whale watching hotspot of Kaikoura is one of the only places in the world where you can see sperm whales all year round. Humpback whales and orcas also populate the area at certain times of the year and dolphins, seals and albatross can be spotted all year round. More »

Borneo

Home to 10 different primate species as well as elephants, leopards, rhinos, reptiles, birds and more, the tropical rainforests are alive with colourful and varied wildlife. Borneo is one of only two places in the world where orangutans still survive. The orangutan's greatest threat is habitat destruction for palm oil plantations. Fred Galdikas from Orangutan Conservation International believes that increasing tourism to the area is helping locals realise that orangutans are 'Borneo's treasure' and they need to be protected. Ask your travel agent how your trip can help contribute to the conservation and protection of this incredible species. More »

Your couch

The simplest and most affordable way to see animals in their natural habitat -- through your TV screen. Nature and wildlife documentaries can offer amazing insights into the lives of animals, often allowing you to get (virtually) closer than you ever would be able to in the wild. (And no animal has to spend their lives in captivity for the sake of entertainment.)

Do you know a great animal documentary? Share in the comments below.

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STA Travel says NO to cruel animal attractions

STA Travel says NO to cruel animal attractions

Posted 23 May 2014   by Amy         Permalink | 7 Comments

Tags: STA Travel, tourism, exotic animals, good news, elephants, tigers, orcas, SeaWorld

Great news for animals :) STA Travel has stopped booking tours that include THIS;

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THIS;

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OR THIS:

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Yep! STA, a major international travel agent for students and young people, has ditched any tours that go to Tiger Temple, SeaWorld (US) or which include elephant rides. Why? Because animals should be like this;

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this;

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and this:

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Big cats, elephants and orcas have all been known to suffer when kept in captivity and denied a natural environment. An investigation into Tiger Temple revealed that tigers were kept in small cages for 20 hours a day with practically nothing to do. These crappy living conditions meant that many of the tigers suffered severe behavioural problems such as pacing back and forth and chewing their own paws :(

The life of an elephant kept for tourist rides is just as cruel. Elephants in the wild may walk over 40km a day and will form life-long bonds. But captive elephants will be chained for many hours a day and often deprived of social contact with other elephants.

And as for SeaWorld in the US, well imagine living your entire life in a bathtub and you might get an idea of what it's like for an orca in captivity. (I think Jason Biggs expresses his thoughts about this better than I could.) So it probably won't come as a surprise to hear that animals in marine parks can suffer from stress and depression living in captivity. Just recently SeaWorld in Orlando was busted giving anti-anxiety drugs to whales.

Sooooooo... a HUGE high-five to STA Travel for taking a stand for animals and refusing to take part in this cruelty any longer :) This will make a WORLD of difference for animals. You can let STA Travel know how awesome you think they are for leading the way in ethical tourism by leaving a message on their Facebook page.

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Earlier this year, Intrepid Travel also took a stance for animals by taking elephant rides off their travel itinerary :) Want to see other travel companies getting on board the responsible tourism for animals train? Click here to get in touch with Flight Centre today and ask them to cut cruelty from their travel itinerary too!

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And if you're an animal lover like me you might be wondering how you can get up close and personal with animals without having to take their freedoms away. Click here for 5 ways to interact with animals without cages. Or leave a suggestion of your own in the comments :)

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