Animals Australia Unleashed
Change the World Who Cares? Videos Take Action! The Animals Community Forum Shop Blog Display
1 2 3
Your E-Mail: O Password:
Login Help     |     Join for Free!     |     Hide This

Post a Reply

Australia rejects bill to ban monkey imports

1 - 1 of 1 posts


robert99 robert99 Sweden Posts: 1360
1 20 Mar 2016
Australia rejects bill to ban monkey imports
https://www.crueltyfreeinternational.org/australia-rejects-bill-ban-monkey-imports

A committee was appointed by the Senate to review the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Bill, introduced by Senator Lee Rhiannon.  This week it said that primates remained important for medical research globally.

Our report was submitted to the committee and highlighted the harmful impact of trapping and transporting monkeys from South East Asia. We also raised public and scientific concerns about the use of monkeys in research

Seems like it nearly sneaked through. Look at the organizations that rushed out to stop the ban.

see Proposal to ban imported monkeys catches scientists off guard - http://www.nature.com/news/proposal-to-ban-imported-monkeys-catches-scientists-off-guard-1.19419
Senator Lee Rhiannon, a member of the Greens party, introduced the bill on 17 September last year as an amendment to Australia’s federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act. But because the Senate committee that deals with this piece of legislation is not usually of interest to those in the medical research community, the amendment almost slipped under the community's radar, says Price. By the time he heard about the proposed ban, from another researcher, the window for public comment was days away from closing, though it was later extended.

As soon as they found out, Price and his Monash colleagues James Bourne and Marcello Rosa began e-mailing researchers around the world. Several institutions rushed to submit statements opposing the bill, including the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS), the Society for Neuroscience, headquartered in Washington DC, and the Basel Declaration Society, which promotes the open, transparent and ethical use of animals in research. Australia’s National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australasian Neuroscience Society also sent statements of opposition to the Senate committee.

Animal research, including that on non-human primates, “continues to be the basis for medical advances that have extended our life expectancy”, says the FENS statement, submitted on 4 February. The Society for Neuroscience's statement, dated the same day, says that the proposed legislation would lead to "the loss of critical research resources that will be devastating for Australian science". The committee is now in the process of considering the bill, and will report on it on 1 March, as a prelude to an eventual Senate vote.
ReplyQuote


www.unleashed.org.au