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CSIRO Diet

1 - 9 of 9 posts


Mel Mel NSW Posts: 289
1 26 Aug 2010
Hey everyone,

My fiance has been following the CSIRO diet lately so that there is a meal plan in the house. WHen we don't have a plan sometimes we don't even eat dinner, terrible I know, otherwise we get awful takeaway since it's the only place open when he gets home from work and things.

Anyway, I wanted to know if anyone has any links about the CSIRO diet that elaborate on its funding from the meat and dairy industry and articles that dispute its scientific testing.

The other thing I want to know is if there's any meal plans out there that are vegan or vegetarian and include Australian available foods I could use for us instead. I still haven't found one after these years. Starting to think I may have to create one.

Hope you're all having fun!

Mel
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JaimieCS JaimieCS VIC Posts: 363
2 26 Aug 2010
The CSIRO diet is a generally healthy eating plan. There's nothing wrong with it.... if you're an omnivore. The CSIRO is supported by the meat and dairy industries, but that doesn't mean it's not an excellent eating plan - meat IS a good source of protein and dairy products have their place as a protein and fat as well. (I would of course, argue that there are better ways to do it without meat and dairy, but that doesn't make this diet invalid.)

I think you'd have to put your own together. It's not that difficult, it just takes time. You need to research the energy/protein/fat/carb/nutrient levels required for a steady, healthy diet and then apply them to vegetarian foods. You'd need to look at the energy etc. content for each food/ingredient and map it all out.

To be honest though, if you stick to the same principles of the healthy eating plan, whereby a lunch/dinner plate is divided into 4 quarters, one is carb/startchy vegetable, one is protein and 2 are salad/non-startchy vegetable, and you make sure you stay around the right energy level (6-10 thousand kj per day, depending on the individual) it usually works out alright.
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Tanya M Tanya M VIC Posts: 741
3 26 Aug 2010
I've just finished reading "The China Study" and my next book is "CSIRO Perfidy" which I'm looking forward to. The China Study was compelling reading. I think I'll start a separate thread about it.
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Mel Mel NSW Posts: 289
4 26 Aug 2010
Thanks. Apparently there are a lot of scientists up in arms about the CSIRO's claims about the diet since it was only tested on females who had syndrome x, and only on 50 of them.
I have read that the diet is not good because it requires you to eat between 350 to 500g of meat a day and that puts stress on the body.
I really wish there was a meal plan already. I don't have much time to sit down and plan things out.
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Ellim Ellim United Kingdom Posts: 480
5 26 Aug 2010
There are a few different meal plans in the book 'Becoming Vegan' based on different requirements.  It's been a while since I have looked at them, but from memory they are fairly comprehensive and would be quite easy to adapt to a bigger/longer meal plan.  It would at least save some of the preliminary work.  

Otherwise there are some samples here:
http://living-vegan.blogspot.com/2007/02/vegan-sample-meal-plans.html
http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/meals
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JaimieCS JaimieCS VIC Posts: 363
6 27 Aug 2010
Mel said:
Thanks. Apparently there are a lot of scientists up in arms about the CSIRO's claims about the diet since it was only tested on females who had syndrome x, and only on 50 of them.
I have read that the diet is not good because it requires you to eat between 350 to 500g of meat a day and that puts stress on the body.
I really wish there was a meal plan already. I don't have much time to sit down and plan things out.
Eating a diet high in lean protein isn't necessarily a bad thing, eating that much meat (as long as it wasnt all red) wouldn't be bad for you, but nor is it as good as spreading out your sources of protein.


There is the Eat to Live program, there's a book, but here's an explanation.

http://fatfreevegan.com/blog/category/eat-to-live/

it does require some planning on your part, but i believe the book is more specific.
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Tanya M Tanya M VIC Posts: 741
7 27 Aug 2010
JaimieCS said:
Mel said:
Thanks. Apparently there are a lot of scientists up in arms about the CSIRO's claims about the diet since it was only tested on females who had syndrome x, and only on 50 of them.
I have read that the diet is not good because it requires you to eat between 350 to 500g of meat a day and that puts stress on the body.
I really wish there was a meal plan already. I don't have much time to sit down and plan things out.
Eating a diet high in lean protein isn't necessarily a bad thing, eating that much meat (as long as it wasnt all red) wouldn't be bad for you, but nor is it as good as spreading out your sources of protein.
Not according to the China Study. The author says that putting animal protein in our bodies is one of the worst things we can do for our health.
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Jojo Jojo VIC Posts: 175
8 27 Aug 2010
JaimieCS said:
Eating a diet high in lean protein isn't necessarily a bad thing, eating that much meat (as long as it wasnt all red) wouldn't be bad for you, but nor is it as good as spreading out your sources of protein.
There's a lot of evidence that we shouldn't eat a diet high in protein or fat for that matter.  High protein diets can cause kidney failure, impaired liver function, osteoporosis, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders and more...
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tarkine tarkine Iran Posts: 296
9 28 Aug 2010
Leaving aside the dubious ethics of unnecessarily torturing and killing animals, I think it's fair to say that there is very little consensus among the scientific community on human nutrition generally... the experts (both omni and vegan alike) are often the first to admit that more research is needed.

While I'm no expert myself, I'm personally not convinced that eating small quantities of meat from time to time is likely to have seriously adverse consequences for human health (it's still morally wrong, imho, and evidently unnecessary). That said, the diet advocated by the CSIRO demands a ridiculous consumption of animal protein on a scale that even the most hard-core carnivores would struggle to meet on a daily basis. I think it is medically irresponsible (dodgy science), manifestly corrupt (private industry funding government scientists?), and a gross over-reaction to the problem of processed foods in our society (yes, people eat too many refined carbohydrates, but that doesn't necessarily mean they should eat more meat... just that they should eat more fresh fruit and vegies, and possibly less calories overall)

Like I said, I'm not an expert... these are just my thoughts.
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