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France! and Europe

Anybody been vegan in France? Tips? or would just like to speak French to me?

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CUPCAKES! CUPCAKES! VIC Posts: 177
1 1 Dec 2010
In a week I'm off to France for exchange. Daunting, I know, but pretty exciting. confused
And AMAZINGLY my host sister is vegan (or possibly vegetarian, I'm lost in translation)

Do you have any tips or advice? On a European winter, French food, travel?

Alors, comment allez-vous? Voudriez-vous aimer parler Français? confused
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carinaforkeeps carinaforkeeps NSW Posts: 484
2 1 Dec 2010
My sister lived in France for nine months.

Here's her advice.

1. Be prepared for people to be rude to you, especially if you don't speak French. They will tell you that they don't speak English- they almost all do. They just aren't interested in helping.
2. LEARN BASIC FRENCH!

Helpful right? Haha.

Good luck!!
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CUPCAKES! CUPCAKES! VIC Posts: 177
3 1 Dec 2010
carinaforkeeps said:
My sister lived in France for nine months.

Here's her advice.

1. Be prepared for people to be rude to you, especially if you don't speak French. They will tell you that they don't speak English- they almost all do. They just aren't interested in helping.
2. LEARN BASIC FRENCH!

Helpful right? Haha.

Good luck!!
Thanks for the advice. It's okay, I've studied French for four years so I will be communicate a little, very slowly though :S
I'm hearing about all this rudeness from everyone! At least I won't be shocked when I'm there.
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babynighthawk babynighthawk VIC Posts: 105
4 1 Dec 2010
I studied French for several years, and the best advice I got from native french people, Mauritians, and travellers alike is to expect them to be rude to you. You could speak no French, or perfect French, but if it's noticable that you're not a native French speaker, they'll more than likely be rude to you.
That aside, don't let it deter you, France is a beautiful country.

I can understand the confusion with your host sister, as 'I am vegan' is 'Je suis végétalien' and 'I am vegetarian' is 'Je suis végétarien' ... It could be useful to say 'Je ne mangez pas d'œufs ou de produits laitiers' which is 'I don't eat eggs or dairy products' which could be tacked on the end of saying 'je suis végétalien' for clarity happy

ETA - buy a spencer and long johns, and layer it up for the cold weather. Layers are the key because you can strip off when you get inside  funny
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carinaforkeeps carinaforkeeps NSW Posts: 484
5 1 Dec 2010
Laratilly13 said:
carinaforkeeps said:
My sister lived in France for nine months.

Here's her advice.

1. Be prepared for people to be rude to you, especially if you don't speak French. They will tell you that they don't speak English- they almost all do. They just aren't interested in helping.
2. LEARN BASIC FRENCH!

Helpful right? Haha.

Good luck!!
Thanks for the advice. It's okay, I've studied French for four years so I will be communicate a little, very slowly though :S
I'm hearing about all this rudeness from everyone! At least I won't be shocked when I'm there.
Haha rude or otherwise, you're going to experience another culture which is awesome.
I heard a lot of negativity only because my sister lived with a very rich, therefore arrogant and obnoxious , French family.
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Clud Clud VIC Posts: 1559
6 1 Dec 2010
Bonjour,
Je parle un peu de Francaise et je etudais le Francaise pour trois annes. Un peu de restaurants vegetariane en France - www.happcow.com. Le gens francaise n'est vegetariane pas, un peu de gens est vegetariane, donc tu es parle le serveurs what you can and cannot eat very strictly and be sure to say that you don't eat les poissons et les poulet. Mais, tu es parle 'je ne mange ni poissons ni poulet' they will think your vegan.
A les supermarches, tu es voir les tofu, lait de soy et beaucoup des legumes et fruits. Parle francaise et les gens es bonne, mais parle angalsie et les gens es mauvaise lol! The French are proud of their ways, culture and language so act french, celebrate their holidays and they will act normaly to you.
Thats enough from me for now. Bonvoyage. Oh lol and sorry for the spelling and grammar mistakes and lack of accents lol!
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ShadowDoubt ShadowDoubt QLD Posts: 753
7 1 Dec 2010
Callum said:
Bonjour,
Je parle un peu de Francaise et je etudais le Francaise pour trois annes. Un peu de restaurants vegetariane en France - www.happcow.com. Le gens francaise n'est vegetariane pas, un peu de gens est vegetariane, donc tu es parle le serveurs what you can and cannot eat very strictly and be sure to say that you don't eat les poissons et les poulet. Mais, tu es parle 'je ne mange ni poissons ni poulet' they will think your vegan.
A les supermarches, tu es voir les tofu, lait de soy et beaucoup des legumes et fruits. Parle francaise et les gens es bonne, mais parle angalsie et les gens es mauvaise lol! The French are proud of their ways, culture and language so act french, celebrate their holidays and they will act normaly to you.
Thats enough from me for now. Bonvoyage. Oh lol and sorry for the spelling and grammar mistakes and lack of accents lol!
Smooth Cal... happy
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JaimieCS JaimieCS VIC Posts: 363
8 1 Dec 2010
If you want to practice your french, you have to be prepared to persevere with it. As soon as you speak, they'll start speaking in English, and sigh at you if you still reply in french. It's the only way to learn though.

Try not to speak english every time you come across an anglophone, if direct communication is too difficult, try to still use common french phrases amongst the english, even just yes, no, sorry, please, thankyou etc.

You won't be able to eat out much....
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meh meh NSW Posts: 2674
9 1 Dec 2010
Just say 'je ne comprends pas' over and over, lol! wink
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Ellim Ellim United Kingdom Posts: 480
10 1 Dec 2010
On the cold (as it's fairly similar in France to the UK at the moment):
-don't buy a winter coat before you leave.  I promise you it won't be warm enough.  Bring money and do it as soon as you arrive.
-BRING GLOVES and a VERY WARM HAT and GREAT SOCKS. (I have found a scarf to be less important to these things - as mostly when you're outside you'll have a big winter coat on)
-Layer.  When you're in buildings or in the metro it will be warm, sometimes hot.  When you're outside it will be very cold.  Right now, in Paris, it is -2.  You will get sick if you don't layer because you will either be too hot or too cold.  To give you an idea, this is what I wore out today: singlet, medium weight sweater, light cardigan, jeans, socks, legwarmers (great because you can pull them up if cold, or just push them down if need be), warm boots.  Winter coat, hat with ear muffs, arm warmers (like elbow length gloves with a 'hand hole' and a thumb hole), and mittens.  I have two winter coats - one for above 0 and one for below 0 (if you're only going to buy one, buy one that will stand up to -15ish.  Yesterday here in London, with windchill it was -12 in the city.  Good coats do not have to be expensive, mine was only £20 and it is wonderful.)  Winter coats look like doonas - if you're unsure, I can send you some pictures.  Get one that is knee length or longer. (ETA: but obviously not something that will restrict your movement.  Mine is about 5 cms past my knee and I find it the perfect length.  My 'autumn' coat (my above 0 coat) is about hip-length and it wouldn't be enough on really cold days.  As you're heading into winter proper, I think a real winter coat should be number one on your hit list.  I haven't worn my 'autumn' coat for about a week now as it's been too cold.)

Now - all that coldness lecturing aside - have an amazing time!  The cold isn't a barrier to fun.  It snowed here yesterday and it was awesome!  If you dress the right way, it won't ever be a problem for you!
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