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Working in the Poultry Industry

moral dilemma

1 - 10 of 15 posts   1 | 2  


Lars Lars NSW Posts: 825
1 13 Apr 2012
ok, so i think i can guess the outcome of this but I wanted to get your thoughts on this anyway

So, Im a student, and i havent worked in months, I need a job, and I answered an ad for an "egg collector/farm hand" not far from where i live. I have no clue whether or not it's free-range, barn laid whatever.

I'm vegan, and don't eat eggs myself, would it be absolutely horrible if i took the job TEMPORARILY until i find something better?

Hypothetically if i did take the job I wouldn't take it if it were caged eggs, and if it were barn I would see what kind of conditions and then make a judgement call.

My pro's are that the money i make there would never get back to them, as i do not buy animal related products

But really, I don't think i'll end up going through with it, I feel bad just thinking about it

thoughts?
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4_da_animals1 4_da_animals1 SA Posts: 3293
2 13 Apr 2012
It's probably not a bad idea. I took up a job at a local dairy industry for a period of time.. and I must say.. you think you know everything about the cruelty of those industries.. but until you physically work at one.. you really don't. If you take a job there you will receive first hand experience of the industry and how it works, and will have a solid cement argument against those who are skeptical of the cruelty involved. As you have wroked there yourself, seen it for yourself. However you are providing further support for the industry... but on the other hand.. if it is not you working there, there will be someone else anyway. Does this make any sense?
edit: in the end it is your decision, on what you can cope with morally. No one can live a perfect cruelty-free life, we do the best we can with what we receive of the world. peace
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Jane Jane SA Posts: 168
3 13 Apr 2012
The chickens confined on the farm might also appreciate seeing a friendly face.

Once at uni we had to put some chickens that were part of a just finished project into crates to go on the back of a truck to the slaughterhouse - I would have rather taken all the chooks home - but I did it because I knew the few chickens I put on there would at least be put there gently, not shoved on there.

You might be able to give a few hens some comfort and while it won't make a difference in the grand scheme of things - it could mean the world to those few birds.

Of course, you also need to look after number one though - so if you think it would be too upsetting for you to see hens in distress, you should probably look at something else.

There's certainly pros and cons to ponder on before you decide for sure! Good luck!
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Lee96 Lee96 QLD Posts: 55
4 13 Apr 2012
It really depends if it is a larger operation or a small-time farm looking for a helping hand.

I grew up in a rural town and have first hand experience with farms, from both friends and family. If it is a small farm, generally the animals don't have that bad of an existence, apart from it being cut short. If it was a factory/larger operation, I, personally, would refuse. But the decision is up to you.
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Andrewxxx Andrewxxx VIC Posts: 272
5 14 Apr 2012
I wouldn't do it just because I couldn't stand it but I can't really see a moral problem with it. The job will be filled by someone else if you don't take it. Possibly someone who won't treat the animals as best they could in the particular situation.

The moral dilemma lies with the consumers who demand eggs so cheap they have to be raised this way and/or the companies who resort to these methods to increase their profits, not the workers.
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Mel17 Mel17 SA Posts: 98
6 14 Apr 2012
I couldnt do it. Personally I would rather have no money than support that industry. It's a personal choice though. Do what you have to.
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Glen Glen VIC Posts: 337
7 14 Apr 2012
You don't know until you go.

I'm a former meat industry worker (poultry and bacon/smallgoods) and I've seen and done some abhorrent things, none of which I am proud. However, I've worked with some people over the years who defy the norms - one, for instance, was a fellow cleaner at Castle Bacon, who happened to be a vegan Buddhist. He needed the money, just like the rest of us.

You can always trial the job and see if it conflicts with your moral stance. I'll make one small point though: you will, and there is no doubt here, smell like chook poo for DAYS after setting foot on a chook farm. The shortest term of employment I've seen on a poultry farm was the time it took one bloke to step out of his car and smell the place. He got back in, drove off, and we never saw him again!
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Mel17 Mel17 SA Posts: 98
8 14 Apr 2012
Wow, a vegan buddhist. I just couldn't do it. How did you sleep at night? I'm not having a go at you, I just couldn't imagine!
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Deespark Deespark QLD Posts: 328
9 15 Apr 2012
I see no moral reasons not to, as of you don't work for them, someone else will.
If you can handle it that is. Be nice to the chickens. If it's a bad place and you see things you think are wrong, why not try and get footage of it? Mean while you are earning money that will not be going back to them.

Personally I don't know if I could do it unless I was going to be getting footage of everything
And I could never do anything like debeaking
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Glen Glen VIC Posts: 337
10 15 Apr 2012
Mel17 said:
Wow, a vegan buddhist. I just couldn't do it. How did you sleep at night? I'm not having a go at you, I just couldn't imagine!
Not me, a bloke I worked with years ago. James, his name was. Very very nice fella, lived in a little log cabin way out in the forest and the bacon company was the closest available employment to an untrained and unskilled labourer.

Buddhism is not about extremes, nor categories. It's about the middle way, and doing what you personally must do to pave your path to Nirvana. James was a very cruisy type of bloke, and nothing ever bothered him aside the obvious slaughter of pigs on a daily basis. But, when you need the money badly enough, you'll do what you have to do to ensure there is food on the table.
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