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A Short Essay

Why animal abuse and the slave trade is the same argument

1 - 9 of 9 posts


NickM NickM NSW Posts: 71
1 24 Nov 2012
Why animal abuse and the slave trade is the same argument with a 150 year time lag.

I'm one for dealing with the roots of issues. Putting Band-Aids over machete wounds isn't going to solve problems long term. It only validates current behaviour. The problem I'm talking about is putting economics above morality. We must learn from past wrongs in order to further our moral position.

There have been historical milestones that reinforce the importance of morality over profit. In my opinion, the abolition of slavery was the most significant of these milestones. Centuries ago, slaves were the poorly recognised backbone of many industries – including farming. Many people across the world panicked upon hearing the argument of slave trade abolitionists and thought they would lose their livelihoods. Reason and rational arguments prevailed. However, the story of Haiti remains a contemporary wound that is yet to heal. While the Haitians can currently call themselves technically free, up until 1947 they were required to compensate France for the freedom of their people. France demanded compensation in 1825 of a sum equivalent to $17b Euros today, despite slavery being illegal at the time. Presently, according to the website, Worldcrunch.com (2012), “French government spokeswoman Najat Vallaud-Belkacem insisted that any reparations for France’s role in slavery would be “moral only”. The result is that France continues to benefit from monies paid, while Haiti still lies crippled from past economic oppression and a lack of ability to rebuild after disaster stuck in 2010.

Currently, those profiting from the animal slave trade, that is, the use of animals for any purpose other than that of their own choosing, including, but not limited to, farming, scientific, entertainment and recreation purposes are not ready to admit they are gaining unfair advantage from the imprisonment and slaughter of animals for their benefit. This is no different to those benefitting from slave labour refusing to admit guilt for their perpetrations. Just as France is only offering moral reparations, indeed so too, the proponents of the animal slave trade are only offering lip service to the animal rights movement. They do not want to admit they are unfairly using and abusing living beings against their will, but are content in recognising what is termed animal welfare, as though it is some fair compromise to an animal whose life they deem is only of significance to the owner and only for economic or otherwise trivial purposes.

Humans and non-human animals should not be marketable commodities. Living sentient beings are not commodities like wheat, spices, coal, and gold. They are living, feeling beings of sentience. We need to restructure our economy to take animals off the table, not wiggle and jiggle the system to allow people to continue to use them. It is abhorrent and unjustifiable. To the farmers who believe they have the right to buy and sell life, I challenge you to ask yourself “what makes the interests of an animal less than a human?” Where shall you draw the line? Biology, ability to feel pain, morphological features? Be careful where you draw the line. If you wish to include ALL humans you will have to include those with mental deficiencies with an inability to care for themselves. A fully functional pig, sheep or chicken is able to have, care and provide for their family. The mentally deficient human cannot. No one is willing to sacrifice the rights of the mentally deficient person, so why shall we set our morals aside for the animals? There is no logic here, and a prevalent lack of compassion is evident in those who wish to sacrifice an animal's life to satisfy desires of their own.


Ending live export is the first step to dramatic change. Just as fossil-fuel intensive businesses and those involved in asbestos manufacture are being forced to seek profits elsewhere, I urge animal farmers to heed this warning. If logic prevails, and governments refuse compensation when animal use is outlawed, farmers are likely to be stuck holding the bag. Government authorities may enforce welfare management programs resulting in additional costs to feed, spay and care for animals until their natural death. I foresee that those animal farmers looking to cut costs and eliminate their flock cheaply will face criminal charges and likely to be asked to justify their actions. For the farmer, I fear ‘financial hardship’ will not be a sufficient defense.
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Kelsey1 MsDrago Kelsey1 MsDrago United States Posts: 818
2 25 Nov 2012
Is this for a class? It's good.
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Kelsey1 MsDrago Kelsey1 MsDrago United States Posts: 818
3 25 Nov 2012
Did y ou write this?
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NickM NickM NSW Posts: 71
4 25 Nov 2012
Hi Kelsey,

No it wasn't for a class. It was going to be a reply to a Facebook thread comment, but it turned into a larger piece of writing.

One of my friends told me the situation about Haiti and I looked into it further. I hope you enjoyed the piece.

Nick
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4_da_animals1 4_da_animals1 SA Posts: 3293
6 27 Nov 2012
This is an interesting piece, and while I lean towards agreement, I would just like to note that you ought to be careful with whom you present this argument to.
A lot of people specifically not of Caucasian decent, or those with friends and/or family of non-Caucasian decent would find this comparison extremely insulting on a personal level.
While it's not meant to be received as an insult, that's clearly not what your intending, for those from decent of a race with pasts linked to slavery and discrimination that still occurs today, it's a sensitive topic and may see otherwise.

Great writing though! peace
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lucidity lucidity SA Posts: 54
7 28 Nov 2012
4_da_animals1 said:
This is an interesting piece, and while I lean towards agreement, I would just like to note that you ought to be careful with whom you present this argument to.
A lot of people specifically not of Caucasian decent, or those with friends and/or family of non-Caucasian decent would find this comparison extremely insulting on a personal level.
While it's not meant to be received as an insult, that's clearly not what your intending, for those from decent of a race with pasts linked to slavery and discrimination that still occurs today, it's a sensitive topic and may see otherwise.

Great writing though! peace
i think if anything they're the best people to direct it to, even though they may get offended... Basically anything we say to anyone about animal rights is offensive to them because we are questioning their lifestyle. I am polish and much of my family was affected by nazi germany, and I am the first to compare what is happening to the animals to the holocaust. If someone gets insulted this is when you get them to question why they are insulted! Because its an animal? Though I may be entirely wrong happy
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NickM NickM NSW Posts: 71
8 1 Dec 2012
4_da_animals1 said:
This is an interesting piece, and while I lean towards agreement, I would just like to note that you ought to be careful with whom you present this argument to.
A lot of people specifically not of Caucasian decent, or those with friends and/or family of non-Caucasian decent would find this comparison extremely insulting on a personal level.
While it's not meant to be received as an insult, that's clearly not what your intending, for those from decent of a race with pasts linked to slavery and discrimination that still occurs today, it's a sensitive topic and may see otherwise.

Great writing though! peace
Which part did you think may have been offensive? I always try to be as objective as possible in my writing happy
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NickM NickM NSW Posts: 71
9 1 Dec 2012
Yes - great speech! Was there any particular reason you referenced it?
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