Animals Australia Unleashed
Change the World Who Cares? Videos Take Action! The Animals Community Forum Shop Blog Display
1 2 3
Your E-Mail: O Password:
Login Help     |     Join for Free!     |     Hide This

Post a Reply

Irresponisble pet owners

What should I do?

1 - 6 of 6 posts


Sara Smileyface Sara Smileyface VIC Posts: 29
1 27 May 2013
There's a park, and one of  the houses next to the park owns rabbits. People often walk their dogs in this park and me and others have told these people countless times that their rabbits are out. They do go and get them and bring them home, but they keep escaping. I mean daily. They were out yesterday, out again today, and the rabbits are more than likely going to get mauled or may come across some cold hearted people  and get mistreated.
These people have kids, young kids, and they do seem like nice people, but this is obviously unacceptable. What should I do?
ReplyQuote

Deespark Deespark QLD Posts: 328
2 27 May 2013
Hmm, possibly contact your local council and see if they can do anything about it? If that doesn't work, maybe try contacting the rspca. If someone official talks to them about it, they'll probably be less likely to let them keep getting out.

You could also always leave notes in their mail box, pointing out how dangerous it is for the rabbits. Maybe even tell them a white lie and say you saw some kids chasing one or throwing things at it.

Some people just don't realize how dangerous the outside world can be for pets, and figure they can handle themselves, and maybe that they should enjoy having freedom (Which they should have, but if you're taking care of a domesticated pet it should only be let loose in an enclosed environment, like a fenced in area, where the animal can't get itself into trouble).

Other than that, there's not a lot you can do. Likely one day the owners will realize how dangerous that is and will stop letting it happen.
ReplyQuote

noddysmiley noddysmiley SA Posts: 75
3 29 May 2013
Hmmm, I noticed that early in the morning there is a rabbit running free the next block over from my house. I never thought much of it, because he always looks fairly happy and he's pretty quick and I never see him during the day. Only at like 6am. Sometimes I worry he might have a run in with a car. Rabbits seem to behave very much like cats in my experience though, so I figure if the cats in my area get along in the street ok, rabbit is probably fine.

I don't think dogs or other people probably pose more threat to the rabbits than they do to a cat, particularly if the rabbits can escape back home when danger presents itself. I'm more concerned that said rabbits may find themselves contributing to any local feral populations. A call to the RSPCA or council is probably a good idea. Maybe then they can get some proper advice about rabbit containment, or even that they could welcome the rabbits into their home (which is the only way I would keep a rabbit!). Some people are pretty clueless about pets. I like to give them the benefit of the doubt that they're just not educated. They don't always deserve that, but I'm nice to a fault and I'm not planning to change tongue
ReplyQuote

Sara Smileyface Sara Smileyface VIC Posts: 29
4 30 May 2013
noddysmiley said:
Hmmm, I noticed that early in the morning there is a rabbit running free the next block over from my house. I never thought much of it, because he always looks fairly happy and he's pretty quick and I never see him during the day. Only at like 6am. Sometimes I worry he might have a run in with a car. Rabbits seem to behave very much like cats in my experience though, so I figure if the cats in my area get along in the street ok, rabbit is probably fine.

I don't think dogs or other people probably pose more threat to the rabbits than they do to a cat, particularly if the rabbits can escape back home when danger presents itself. I'm more concerned that said rabbits may find themselves contributing to any local feral populations. A call to the RSPCA or council is probably a good idea. Maybe then they can get some proper advice about rabbit containment, or even that they could welcome the rabbits into their home (which is the only way I would keep a rabbit!). Some people are pretty clueless about pets. I like to give them the benefit of the doubt that they're just not educated. They don't always deserve that, but I'm nice to a fault and I'm not planning to change tongue
This park pretty much is a dog park, dogs can be off leash as long as they're 5 metres from the playground, and they're not a very fast breed, bunnies maybe? Every time I walk past they run away, usually under a bush, but my dog and most peoples dogs wouldn't
hesitate to attack it. It I wanted to, I could probably catch them!
It's kind of annoying, because I have a blue heeler and his 2 pups, which are nearly a year old, so they're not little, and I can't take them there, I know they wont hesitate for a second and 3 big dogs are hard to control. :c
I'm nice, I don't want them to get in trouble, at the same time, I'm just concerned the rabbits will get torn to bits and even more concerned one of the little girls will see it. One of their kids is like 4 years old :c
ReplyQuote

..1 ..1 TAS Posts: 2265
5 30 May 2013
I would first approach the owners and suggest that they put up fencing. It only has to be simple, chicken wire fencing, to keep the rabbits in, and the dogs out. If they refuse, then contact the RSPCA, who will request that the owners appropriately house the rabbits. If again nothing changes, contact your local council and notify them that the rabbits are at constant risk by the dogs at the park, and that they are making you feel uncomfortable when you take your dogs there.

I have no issues with rabbits being free, my own rabbit is desexed and is not housed in any kind of pen or cage. He has access to the entire property, and has a sheltered area full of hay in the carport for him to sleep in. Our property is well fenced so he never gets out (although we have a crazy neighbour who opens our gate, lets him out, then knocks on our door saying our rabbit escaped). So I don't think they are being irresponsible owners, their rabbits are living better lives than most who live in small, wired cages. They just need to understand that their animals are to be kept within the perimeters of their own property.
ReplyQuote

Sara Smileyface Sara Smileyface VIC Posts: 29
6 2 Jun 2013
Maggie said:
I would first approach the owners and suggest that they put up fencing. It only has to be simple, chicken wire fencing, to keep the rabbits in, and the dogs out. If they refuse, then contact the RSPCA, who will request that the owners appropriately house the rabbits. If again nothing changes, contact your local council and notify them that the rabbits are at constant risk by the dogs at the park, and that they are making you feel uncomfortable when you take your dogs there.

I have no issues with rabbits being free, my own rabbit is desexed and is not housed in any kind of pen or cage. He has access to the entire property, and has a sheltered area full of hay in the carport for him to sleep in. Our property is well fenced so he never gets out (although we have a crazy neighbour who opens our gate, lets him out, then knocks on our door saying our rabbit escaped). So I don't think they are being irresponsible owners, their rabbits are living better lives than most who live in small, wired cages. They just need to understand that their animals are to be kept within the perimeters of their own property.
I've told them that dogs do walk through there, and that it would be a good idea to fix their fence before letting their rabbits roam.
At first I had no problem with it, I just thought they must've got out.. but they're always out, these people have known about it for more than a month probably.
ReplyQuote


www.unleashed.org.au