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Are there any dairy brands that don't kill calfs?

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Butterfree Butterfree WA Posts: 64
1 20 Sep 2013
Unfortunately, I was unable to keep up my veganism (Please don't judge me! Dhappy Im still vegetarian though.
Anywho, I need the most animal friendly dairy brand to buy from, could someone please tell me who to buy from and who to avoid?

Thank u in advance! Xx
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Showbags Showbags QLD Posts: 162
2 20 Sep 2013
Butterfree said:
Unfortunately, I was unable to keep up my veganism (Please don't judge me! Dhappy Im still vegetarian though.
Anywho, I need the most animal friendly dairy brand to buy from, could someone please tell me who to buy from and who to avoid?

Thank u in advance! Xx
There is no commercial brands that don't separate the calf from their mother and send them away to be killed (or to become a dairy calf again in the case of females). Not to mention all the cows end up at a slaughterhouse eventually anyway.

The fact that someone is drinking cow's milk means that a calf isn't. If dairy producing companies kept all cows around their mothers and looked after them then they wouldn't have an economically viable business.

I'm not judging you at all. I don't know your circumstances. But why are you going back to dairy milk? I've heard of a lot of people that go back to eating meat (usually for the fact that they don't feel sated after a meal, which is due to them not consuming enough calorie dense foods not to do with eating vegan) but I haven't heard of many people going back to dairy milk. Dairy milk is not needed in your diet at all and is actually quite unhealthy for humans to consume.
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NayNay Angie NayNay Angie QLD Posts: 1
3 20 Sep 2013
Hi,
I'm vegetarian as well, I use Barambah Organics milk. They are a really good brand and I have heard that they don't kill their calves and I have done lots of research and according to their website none of the calves are sent to the abattoir. So I think they are totally cruelty free!

Hope it helps!  
wave
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Ron Ron NSW Posts: 233
4 20 Sep 2013
NayNay Angie said:
... So I think they are totally cruelty free!
Until the cow stops producing milk or gets old and then has to face the horror of the trip to, and death in, the slaughterhouse. happy

EDIT: I've just visited their website where they state they don't kill calves but send them to their other properties.  What do you think happens to them when they're no longer calves?

http://www.barambahorganics.com.au/barambah-difference/the-farm.aspx
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Lala Lala QLD Posts: 70
5 20 Sep 2013
Showbags said:
Butterfree said:
Unfortunately, I was unable to keep up my veganism (Please don't judge me! Dhappy Im still vegetarian though.
Anywho, I need the most animal friendly dairy brand to buy from, could someone please tell me who to buy from and who to avoid?

Thank u in advance! Xx
There is no commercial brands that don't separate the calf from their mother and send them away to be killed (or to become a dairy calf again in the case of females). Not to mention all the cows end up at a slaughterhouse eventually anyway.

The fact that someone is drinking cow's milk means that a calf isn't. If dairy producing companies kept all cows around their mothers and looked after them then they wouldn't have an economically viable business.

I'm not judging you at all. I don't know your circumstances. But why are you going back to dairy milk? I've heard of a lot of people that go back to eating meat (usually for the fact that they don't feel sated after a meal, which is due to them not consuming enough calorie dense foods not to do with eating vegan) but I haven't heard of many people going back to dairy milk. Dairy milk is not needed in your diet at all and is actually quite unhealthy for humans to consume.
Actually, Barambah organics don't take the calves to be killed But I don't know if they take them away from their mothers.
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lucidity lucidity SA Posts: 54
6 20 Sep 2013
Lala said:
Showbags said:
Butterfree said:
Unfortunately, I was unable to keep up my veganism (Please don't judge me! Dhappy Im still vegetarian though.
Anywho, I need the most animal friendly dairy brand to buy from, could someone please tell me who to buy from and who to avoid?

Thank u in advance! Xx
There is no commercial brands that don't separate the calf from their mother and send them away to be killed (or to become a dairy calf again in the case of females). Not to mention all the cows end up at a slaughterhouse eventually anyway.

The fact that someone is drinking cow's milk means that a calf isn't. If dairy producing companies kept all cows around their mothers and looked after them then they wouldn't have an economically viable business.

I'm not judging you at all. I don't know your circumstances. But why are you going back to dairy milk? I've heard of a lot of people that go back to eating meat (usually for the fact that they don't feel sated after a meal, which is due to them not consuming enough calorie dense foods not to do with eating vegan) but I haven't heard of many people going back to dairy milk. Dairy milk is not needed in your diet at all and is actually quite unhealthy for humans to consume.
Actually, Barambah organics don't take the calves to be killed But I don't know if they take them away from their mothers.
i think they would still take the calf from their mother. it wouldn't be profitable to be sharing their "product" with a calf, or even raising a calf just for the hell of it.

any situation in which you are drinking the milk from another species, no matter how "nice" the farm is, somebody will suffer. my own grandma had a farm, just for herself, no money involved, and in the middle of the night a calf was born then by morning i was horrified to find him/her gone. i don't know where. but he/she definitely didn't have a nice fate. it's just the nature of things. keeping a female calf around may be profitable eventually because she can then also be a dairy cow, but male calves are seen as waste products. why would any dairy farm waste money on raising a cow that was useless to them... unless they were then planning to kill him for meat. so either way he will be killed. either for veal or for beef.

plus it's milk from another species! it's unnatural, bad for you, and you have no need for it. humane dairy just does not exist. stealing milk you have no need for, from a baby, is not humane  cry
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OinkMoo OinkMoo NSW Posts: 1340
7 20 Sep 2013
There is no such thing as a 'Humane' dairy, just like there is no such thing as 'humane' slaughter.

For a cow to produce milk she must have a calf every year, It is a common misconception that only male calves are waste products and females are always used as herd replacement but this is not true, both male and female calves are killed on the farm, sent to auctions and veal farms or sent directly to the slaughterhouse, some female calves are used as herd replacement but this is only a small percentage.

Barambah Organics claim that they don't kill there calves but send them to other farms, they don't state what type of farms these are though, it is simply unrealistic to think that every year hundreds of calves go to loving and caring homes. It is very expensive to raise a bobby calf, I've rescued and raised 6 bobby calves in the last 2 years that I've rescued from the local bobby calf auction ( 3 males and 3 females ) and it costs approx $165 every week to raise one calf let alone hundreds of them. The grim reality is the calves most likely go to farms where they are grown out for veal (females and small boned males) and the larger males are grown out and  are purchased by beef producers and sent to feedlots where they are grown out for cheap beef and sold to fast food chains or there meat is sold to the overseas markets.

The best way to not contribute to the dairy industry is to not consume it or simply lower your dairy intake happy maybe start off have a dairy free day and going from there happy I'm in no way having a go at you I'm just saying the facts tongue
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BFV BFV SA Posts: 138
8 21 Sep 2013
I know someone with a backyard 'hobby farm' who does allow the babies to drink the milk, as well as milking them for his own use (although he still kills the males for meat when they are old enough.)
He believes that his method is humane because 'the animals can produce more than enough milk to go around.'
What he doesn't seem to realise is that the nutrients in the milk are drained from the mother. All animals are capable of producing more milk than is necessary for one baby - this needs to happen in the case of twins/multiples, and some human mothers express milk in advance for babysitters to bottle feed, etc.
But constantly over-milking any animal drains their nutrients and ultimately makes them weak and sick. This is one reason why dairy cows live such short lives. Some collapse from exhaustion after only a few years, compared to their natural lifespan of 25 years.

So in short, I agree with the others. Not judging you for your decision, but unfortunately you won't find any dairy milk that is genuinely humane.
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Kaysiefantasie Kaysiefantasie VIC Posts: 3
9 22 Sep 2013
I appreciate that many passionate animal lovers will only settle for nothing short of veganism, but in reality this is not possible.  Many people simply will not give up their dairy diet (I'm a lacto vegetarian), and taking extreme stances and enforcing an opinion can sometimes alienate people. Coercion through education is what is required. Sometimes it takes steps for awareness to take hold until someone is ready to make an extreme decision.  Even then, many good people will make ethical choices but perhaps not extreme ones. This is still preferred and should be encouraged.    

Dairies that support the best humane practices should be encouraged.  If they do well then it is possible for them to increasingly adopt more humane practices.  Let’s face it, such transitions are expensive and I would rather not lose these types of farmers to an economic failing.  These farmers need to be supported so that they can build their farms and increasingly put their ethical philosophies into practice so as to replace the current inhumane industry and so become the benchmark.  

Ok, so…some dairy farmers have ethical and humane practices, some more than others. Some uphold good bobby calf practices and some are even slaughter-free. The Hare Krishna farm and Barambah dairy, both near the NSW/WQLD border are slaughter-free dairies. See this link for info on Barambah:

http://www.barambahorganics.com.au/barambah-difference/the-farm.aspx

While it is not possible for some dairies to adopt a slaughter-free philosophy, they should be applauded and supported for providing humane practices. Elgar is one such dairy.  See this link for info on them:

http://www.ethical.org.au/blog/elgaar-farms-responds-on-bobby-calves/

K

cloud9
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Ron Ron NSW Posts: 233
10 22 Sep 2013
Sorry but that link certainly doesn't support your case:

"Our male calves are reared as above, and those that are not kept as replacement bulls (we have several bulls with the herd) are sent to a local abattoir after a period of 2 to 4 months"
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