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What's the difference between a vegetarian and a ovo-lacto vegetarian?

Is there even a difference?

1 - 10 of 17 posts   1 | 2  


Abbiero Abbiero NSW Posts: 31
1 7 Apr 2015
Hi everyone!

I have been hearing a lot of people lately identify themselves as an ovo-lacto vegetarian. In short, this term means that they do not consume any meat, but do eat eggs and dairy products.

I understand that generally speaking, when someone uses the term "vegetarian", an ovo-lacto vegetarian is assumed - as usually, it is vegans who do not eat eggs and dairy.

I would like to know - do you think the term is necessary? I see no difference between a vegetarian and an ovo-lacto vegetarian, although obviously there would be a difference between an ovo vegetarian or a lacto vegetarian compared to a vegetarian who consumes vegetables and animal by-products such as milk and other dairy products and eggs.

Please share your opinions! Also, I am curious to know - are you a vegan, vegetarian, ovo or lacto vegetarian? happy
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Purple Princess Purple Princess ACT Posts: 64
2 7 Apr 2015
i am an lacto-ovo vegetarian



the difference is that lacto-ovo vegetarian still eat dairy products but a normal vegetarian eats whatever

Hope its helped
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Abbiero Abbiero NSW Posts: 31
3 7 Apr 2015
Purple Princess said:
i am an lacto-ovo vegetarian



the difference is that lacto-ovo vegetarian still eat dairy products but a normal vegetarian eats whatever

Hope its helped
Hi! Thank you for your reply, that's very interesting!

My point is though - a regular vegetarian generally eats eggs and dairy products as well so (in my opinion) I think the term ovo-lacto vegetarian is fairly redundant!

I would understand if someone was only ovo or only lacto.. but the combination of both seems pointless as that is generally what a vegetarian is anyway!

Please don't take this the wrong way at all, I am not at all criticizing the name and I am happy to address you by vegetarian, vegan, ovo-lacto vegetarian, anything!

I just wanted some clarification on whether the term is redundant or whether it means something different to what I can interpret happy

Thank you again for your quick reply!
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reddapanda reddapanda ACT Posts: 381
4 7 Apr 2015
Stretching my memory, but I recall reading way-back-when that vegetarian didn't include eggs and dairy?

Perhaps vegetarian is a more catch-all category, and then there's a variety of sub-categories.

paw
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Abbiero Abbiero NSW Posts: 31
5 7 Apr 2015
reddapanda said:
Stretching my memory, but I recall reading way-back-when that vegetarian didn't include eggs and dairy?

Perhaps vegetarian is a more catch-all category, and then there's a variety of sub-categories.

paw
It's always good to hear another perspective of what vegetarian is!

Generally, I would label a vegetarian as someone who does not eat meat, but can (if they wish) eat eggs and dairy, as I would identify a vegan as someone who does not consume the animals or their by-products.

Thank you for your input! I do agree with the sub-categories - like I said though, I am unsure whether the term ovo-lacto would be redundant, although they would be necessary when alone such as ovo OR lacto.

confused
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reddapanda reddapanda ACT Posts: 381
6 7 Apr 2015
No problem, happy it's not something I'm entirely sure about either. But perhaps that's in part because words can sort of morph and change their meaning slightly over time too.
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reddapanda reddapanda ACT Posts: 381
7 7 Apr 2015
By the way I identify as both a vegan and vegetarian, and describe myself as both. I think because I see vegetarian as that catch-all term and vegan as a subcategory of being vegetarian, that's just the way I view it though. happy
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Abbiero Abbiero NSW Posts: 31
8 7 Apr 2015
reddapanda said:
By the way I identify as both a vegan and vegetarian, and describe myself as both. I think because I see vegetarian as that catch-all term and vegan as a subcategory of being vegetarian, that's just the way I view it though. happy
Very interesting happy, thank you for sharing your opinion on my confusion, heh!
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Khazlariko Khazlariko NSW Posts: 9
9 8 Apr 2015
This

Abbiero said:
I understand that generally speaking, when someone uses the term "vegetarian", an ovo-lacto vegetarian is assumed
and this

reddapanda said:
I think because I see vegetarian as that catch-all term and vegan as a subcategory of being vegetarian
So if "vegetarian" just means a person who does not eat meat, lacto ovo vegetarian, lacto vegetarian, ovo vegetarian and vegan would all fall under that category. You could also be a vegetarian who doesn't eat dairy or eggs and still not be a vegan, because I feel that "veganism" is a lifestyle that entails much more than what you eat.
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Abbiero Abbiero NSW Posts: 31
10 8 Apr 2015
Khazlariko said:
So if "vegetarian" just means a person who does not eat meat, lacto ovo vegetarian, lacto vegetarian, ovo vegetarian and vegan would all fall under that category. You could also be a vegetarian who doesn't eat dairy or eggs and still not be a vegan, because I feel that "veganism" is a lifestyle that entails much more than what you eat.
That is an excellent point! Thank you for your input, happy !
That's true as well - just because you don't eat meat, eggs or dairy doesn't make you a vegan.

I love hearing about other people's perspective of vegetarian and veganism. I had a friend who identified herself as vegan due to not eating animals or their products, although she would often wear leather, and use makeup that was tested on animals and not vegan - so I wouldn't say that she is a vegan, I would say that she would be a vegetarian.

Veganism is definitely a lifestyle - and vegetarianism! For example, I am a vegetarian, I would say that I would be lacto vegetarian as I do consume dairy although I do not eat eggs. BUT I do not use any makeup or nail polish (I am a nail artist) that are tested on animals and all of them are vegan and cruelty free accredited brands, and I do not wear wool, fur, leather, etc!

Again, thank you for your input!  rabbit
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