Animals Australia Unleashed
Change the World Who Cares? Videos Take Action! The Animals Community Forum Shop Blog Display
1 2 3
Your E-Mail: O Password:
Login Help     |     Join for Free!     |     Hide This

Post a Reply

llamallamaduck.

1 - 10 of 16 posts   1 | 2  


gaytee. gaytee. NSW Posts: 40
1 4 May 2009
So..
I was just wondering.Alpacca wool?
I'm actually yet to do alot of research in the matter, but I'd like to know peoples opinions?
Is buying alpacca wool counted as cruelty to animals?
my best friend owns alpaccas and her mum shaves them every now and again and sells there wool. They are treated like little pet doggys, and they are loved and cared for. The shearing process disregards all the elements of commercial sheep shearing such as  mulesing and when a Alpaccas is ever sick he is taken to the vet where they perform any procedures under strict anesthetics.
But with this all aside, is it still wrong?
because i was thinking alpacca wool would be a good alternative to sheep wool, but im really really unsure, and like peoples advice before I go out and support something which is unfair to animals
ReplyQuote

Jacqui T Jacqui T NSW Posts: 796
2 4 May 2009
If the alpacas are happy and healthy creatures then sure why not- atleast you know you're getting them from a humane and caring breeder.
Now with this said, I have heard of cruelty with alpacas,
just like commercial sheep some do go through the same painful treatment just so the business produces faster.


Don't forget not all sheep shearers and inhumane, coming from a small country I know a few sheep farmers who love their animals dearly, and its the same with your little alpaca friend. The saffest thing would be to buy from your friend as you know exactly how the alpacas are treated so are doing no injustice by buying their wool.
I also think we need more people like the ones you have spoken about!!

That's my opinion anyways.
ReplyQuote

gaytee. gaytee. NSW Posts: 40
3 4 May 2009
Thank you so much (:
I suppose by supporting small buisnesses that treat there animals well would put a message accross to larger companies as well if we get enough people to stop buying commercial items and start buying local!
people can still get there wool products while also knowing that no animals have been exploited!
still, i will never buy wool products from clothes stores and etc. You just have no way of knowing where they get there wool from..
ReplyQuote

_Matt _Matt VIC Posts: 1567
4 5 May 2009
I think this is the same as buy and eating eggs. If I had my own chickens, I would probably eat their eggs as I know how they are treated. But, I can't buy free range eggs from the supermarket as I don't  know how the chickens are treated - and of course they are killed when they don't lay anymore.

The same as if I  knew someone who owned their own sheep/alpacas, like you do, I would buy the wool as I know exactly how they are treated.

Hope I helped  peace
ReplyQuote

Teweesa! Teweesa! NSW Posts: 95
5 5 May 2009
Not really related to the topic, but my boyfriend's mum's friend has an animal sanctuary near where I live, and she has two alpacas there. We were over there one day and as my boyfriend was getting out of the car one of them alpacas came running toward him, full pelt, from across the yard. It ran roughly 50 metres before it skidded to a stop right in front of my boyfriend (who didn't know how to react so he just stood glued to the spot) and gave him a big cuddle.

It was the cutest and funniest thing I've ever seen.
ReplyQuote

Shirley Shirley NSW Posts: 108
6 5 May 2009
so i wanted to add an answer to this topic so i did a quick google.
heres a site based on sheep and how they are treated. alpaca wool as an alternative it's mentioned somewhere here: http://www.savethesheep.com

Intresting copied & pasted info from: http://heebnvegan.blogspot.com/2008/05/and-most-gentile-animals-are-alpacas.html

According to PETA, “The alpaca-wool industry exploded in the 1980s, when South American alpacas and llamas were marketed worldwide to entrepreneurs. The demand for alpaca wool has increased, so much so that herds numbering in the tens of thousands are now raised in the United States and Australia. Most of the world’s alpacas live in Peru, but government officials there believe that Australia could take over the industry within two decades.

-nothing bad is mentioned about the alpaca industry so in my mind i think its going well but it doesnt mean it will continue to go well if the alpaca wool industry continues to become more popular, more alpaca wool will be in demand so it might result in them treating animals like like products as the sheep have turned into.- sad

WOULD YOU EAT AN ALPACA?

Currently, in Australia, alpacas are bred mostly for the beautiful, soft fleece (wool) they produce. There are alpacas being used for meat though and restaurants that offer it on their menus. Just as meat from cattle is called beef and deer is venison, the term being used for alpaca meat in Australia currently is Viande. I have not tasted alpaca meat, but apparently it is quite a lean meat with a taste described as similar to sweet lamb.
Approximately 50% of a carcase is used as prime cuts, such as loin cutlets and steaks, which are sold in either the fresh or frozen meat markets to restaurants, hotels and supermarkets. Secondary cuts are processed into sausages, hot dogs and processed alpaca hams.

-info from yahoo answers

cry EWW THAT IS SO DISGUSTING! yes i know  ashamed2

would you seriously eat an alpaca??: PICTURES-
http://www.musiccityalpacas.com/Versace-and-picard-playing.jpg
http://www.peacefulprairie.com/images/jazmine_closeup_5hbg.jpg

if your curious heres some info about alpacas:
http://www.rivermistfarm.net/alpacas.htm

beaverhug xo
ReplyQuote

Supersktendo Supersktendo VIC Posts: 5
7 5 May 2009
It all depends on the situation and environment in which the animals are kept. I'm sure with what you've already stated you can tell they're not living in a cruel environment where they fear for themselves. So I'm pretty sure you already know the answer to your question.  peace
ReplyQuote

Saresare Saresare NSW Posts: 12
8 13 Jul 2009
Well, it depends. If those alpacas were sheep, it would be the same story. My vegan friend has a sheep which she shears in hot weather, but he lives a happy and comfortable life.

If alpaca wool was used instead of sheep wool, the alpacas would fall to the wool industry and live the same horrible lives as sheep did. You'd only be swapping over the species, not the level of care.
ReplyQuote

x.Tara x.Tara NSW Posts: 357
9 13 Jul 2009
Teweesa! said:
Not really related to the topic, but my boyfriend's mum's friend has an animal sanctuary near where I live, and she has two alpacas there. We were over there one day and as my boyfriend was getting out of the car one of them alpacas came running toward him, full pelt, from across the yard. It ran roughly 50 metres before it skidded to a stop right in front of my boyfriend (who didn't know how to react so he just stood glued to the spot) and gave him a big cuddle.

It was the cutest and funniest thing I've ever seen.
omg that's adorable!!
ReplyQuote

Kirrilly Kirrilly VIC Posts: 2092
10 13 Jul 2009
I would probably only use alpaca wool if I knew where it came from. If you know what conditions the animals are kept in and are happy with them, then I don't really see a problem.
ReplyQuote

< Prev
 [ 1 ]  [ 2 ] 

www.unleashed.org.au