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Slaughtering animals and the law...

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Fuchsia Fuchsia VIC Posts: 2
1 22 Sep 2013
Hi everybody, I don't know anything about this myself, but I have a friend whos family raises goats, sheep and sometimes cows. Today he told me that as the family who were buying a goat eat the brain, they didn't shoot/stun/kill whatever the goat beforehand, just slit his throat...
I think they do this with all their animals. Maybe I'm just sheltered but this seems a little barbaric?? Are people allowed to just do this here?
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tiedyedtofu tiedyedtofu NSW Posts: 221
2 22 Sep 2013
I have no idea, but that is disgusting!!
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BFV BFV SA Posts: 138
3 22 Sep 2013
This is standard practice. I know someone who has goats & sheep in their backyard. They kill them by slitting their throat, and then breaking their neck. They say there is about 5 seconds where the animal is consciously bleeding out before the neck break renders them unconscious. This is someone who considers themselves to be an 'animal whisperer' and believes they take great care of their animals. They also dock the sheep's tails to prevent fly strike, despite there being non-surgical alternatives available.
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BFV BFV SA Posts: 138
4 22 Sep 2013
By the way, the animal's heart needs to be beating to pump out the blood when the throat is slit, so there is no option for a peaceful death for animals we use for food.
Some people consider this a necessary evil, but others look further and realise that eating animals isn't necessary at all, hence causing or preventing their suffering is a choice we can all make every time we sit down for a meal.
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maddie45 maddie45 VIC Posts: 167
5 22 Sep 2013
BFV said:
By the way, the animal's heart needs to be beating to pump out the blood when the throat is slit, so there is no option for a peaceful death for animals we use for food.
Some people consider this a necessary evil, but others look further and realise that eating animals isn't necessary at all, hence causing or preventing their suffering is a choice we can all make every time we sit down for a meal.
I like how you put this sad It makes me so sad that this is even allowed at all though.
Isn't there some horrible religion where they only eat meat of things that have bled to death?
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Showbags Showbags QLD Posts: 162
6 22 Sep 2013
BFV said:
This is standard practice. I know someone who has goats & sheep in their backyard. They kill them by slitting their throat, and then breaking their neck. They say there is about 5 seconds where the animal is consciously bleeding out before the neck break renders them unconscious. This is someone who considers themselves to be an 'animal whisperer' and believes they take great care of their animals. They also dock the sheep's tails to prevent fly strike, despite there being non-surgical alternatives available.
If that is "taking great care" of their animals I'd hate to see their idea of standard care of their animals.
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Fuchsia Fuchsia VIC Posts: 2
7 23 Sep 2013
Damn... guess there's nothing I can do then.
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d2 d2 VIC Posts: 4
8 24 Sep 2013
BFV said:
They also dock the sheep's tails to prevent fly strike, despite there being non-surgical alternatives available.
please give the alernatives and explain why they are better than the standard tail docking
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BFV BFV SA Posts: 138
9 25 Sep 2013
d2 said:
BFV said:
They also dock the sheep's tails to prevent fly strike, despite there being non-surgical alternatives available.
please give the alernatives and explain why they are better than the standard tail docking
Not being a farmer myself, I can only tell you what I've learnt by talking to people at farm sanctuaries and private rescues, but it is definitely possible to avoid tail docking through proper care and hygiene for each animal. These alternatives are not as economical or time efficient as the crueller methods, but if you are genuinely concerned about animal welfare, I would recommend contacting Australian farm sanctuaries, as they can give personal advice from their experience.

Here are a couple of links with a bit of information online, which touch on some alternatives, as well as analgesia suggestions when choosing to perform painful procedures:

http://vip.vetsci.usyd.edu.au/contentUpload/content_2708/SimonAmy.pdf

https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Backgrounders/Pages/Welfare-Implications-of-Tail-Docking-of-Lambs.aspx

Here is an excerpt:

"There are many alternatives available which have been shown to decrease or eliminate distress caused by castration and tail docking of lambs. Morris (2000) reported the success of organic farmers in controlling fly strike by placing flytrap bins in paddocks and regularly inspecting stock. These farmers do not dock lamb tails, or use chemicals to control flies. Many reported to have eliminated fly strike from their farms. Sutherland et al (2002) and Mellor et al (2002) found that the use of local anaesthesia contributed to the significant reduction in cortisol responses of calves after dehorning. Local anaesthetic is rarely used during routine husbandry procedures as it is costly and time consuming. However its importance needs to be re-evaluated. Graham et al (2002) examined variations on the pain response of lambs where the rubber ring was applied to the tail at two different sites. They found that applying the ring 2 cm distal to the site normally used resulted in a significant decrease in active behaviours associated with pain. Such research demonstrates that it is possible to minimize pain caused by routine husbandry procedures such as tail docking and castration of lambs. In fact, docking may not even be necessary, providing the animals are managed effectively."
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Showbags Showbags QLD Posts: 162
10 26 Sep 2013
Fuchsia said:
Damn... guess there's nothing I can do then.
Maybe give Animals Australia a call and explain the situation. The RSPCA are useless and are on the side of animal abusers more often than not but Animals Australia may be able to advise you on what you can or cannot do in this situation.
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